But by your question I suppose you meant, literally, Where are the private boarding schools that feed or once fed the Ivy League? The answer is New England, of course.

A while back I proposed an Ancient Eight for prep schools comprising, in descending order of preppiness, Groton School in Groton, Massachusetts, St. Paul's School in Concord, New Hampshire, Choate School (now Choate Rosemary Hall) in Wallingford, Connecticut, Hotchkiss School in Lakeville, Connecticut, Deerfield Academy in Deerfield, Massachusetts, Lawrenceville School in (non-New England) Lawrenceville, New Jersey, Phillips Exeter Academy in Exeter, New Hampshire, and Phillips Academy in Andover, Massachusetts.

But that was then and this is now.">
 
 
 
 
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Brooklyn Tech High School
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Question:
They (the schools) aren't what you think. They're just secondary schools that attract achievers for one reason or another. Some are selective city high schools, like the Bronx High School of Science, and others are selective private schools, like Andover. A handful of them use to send "tons" to the Ivy League when the Ivy League was more aristocratic than meritocratic. But nowadays they send about as many kids as might be expected to get in on their own (the kids' own) merits, without an advantageous shove, or perhaps with a slightly advantageous shove, from connected college counseling offices.

But by your question I suppose you meant, literally, Where are the private boarding schools that feed or once fed the Ivy League? The answer is New England, of course.

A while back I proposed an Ancient Eight for prep schools comprising, in descending order of preppiness, Groton School in Groton, Massachusetts, St. Paul's School in Concord, New Hampshire, Choate School (now Choate Rosemary Hall) in Wallingford, Connecticut, Hotchkiss School in Lakeville, Connecticut, Deerfield Academy in Deerfield, Massachusetts, Lawrenceville School in (non-New England) Lawrenceville, New Jersey, Phillips Exeter Academy in Exeter, New Hampshire, and Phillips Academy in Andover, Massachusetts.

But that was then and this is now.


Answer:
Just a little quirk of mine, that probably has something to do with the fact that Bronx Science is my high school's (Stuyvesant's) rival school.. or *was* traditionally. But I don't think Bronx can any longer be categorized as a "feeder" school by any stretch of the imagination. The bulk of the top talent (almost 95% if not higher) in New York City (public) is drawn by Stuyvesant and in lesser part by Hunter College High School. Both of those schools (Stuyvesant and Hunter, both in Manhattan) are two amazing schools comprising close to 90-95% of the top students selected from public schools in NYC to the Ivies and other top schools (minus Cornell state colleges). The percentage figure is a rough estimate of admission patterns over the last decade, but I am sure if someone took the time and effort to confirm that the actual figure is not going to be very far off at all. Townshend Harris (Queens) and Midwood (Brooklyn) come in close after Stuy and Hunter in New York City. But college acceptances (though in this case relevant to the question posed) aren't the only measure of the quality of a school. Neither are avg. SAT scores, National Merit finalists, and whatever have you. If they are, I think Stuyvesant and Hunter would easily come out on top. But those two schools (perhaps expectedly so) consistently produce the top talent in other areas as well: musical prodigies, actors, debate, chess, so on and so forth.

Bronx Science most certainly has a rich history and tradition of academic excellence. It is, along with Stuyvesant and Brooklyn Technical High School, one of the three specialized "M & S" high schools in NYC (magnet schools). Students take a common SAT-type examination for all three schools (scored out of an 800) in 8th grade and depending on their performance, get into a certain school. This is the only basis of admissions to all of three schools. Over the last two or so decades, the cutoff score for Stuyvesant has been far higher (by a margin of 75 points) than Bronx. Brooklyn Tech has the lowest cutoff score of the three. There is a preference order students can select of the three so that even if they get a score high enough to get into Stuyvesant, they can still select Tech as their first choice. But around 95% of all the students who take the standarized test list Stuyvesant as their primary choice (and this is a figure often quoted in the critiques of this test-based admissions policy). Hunter also has a test-based admissions policy, but it is a 6year school (whereby students take the exam in 6th grade and enroll at Hunter in the 7th). A good number of Hunterites transfer to Stuyvesant after 8th grade.

About two decades ago or so, Bronx had the highest of the cutoff scores and hence attracted the top talent in the city. It has thus historically been more popular than Stuyvesant in the rest of the country. But over the last two decades, Stuy has shifted as the leader in terms of the cutoff scores and have hence admitted the upper echelon of the students. In 1991, Stuyvesant acquired a new $150 million building (www.stuy.edu) in downtown Manhatan, a mere two minute walk from the World Trade towers. All this has led to the emergence of its reputation in college admissions offices. Bronx, on the other hand, has conversely faded in the other direction.



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