Then, just as suddenly as it appeared, all who saw it said it disappeared into the horizon without answers to what the strange sight was.

Interestingly the National Weather Service fielded more than a dozen calls, and of course there was no report of a downed plane, so the strange object remains a mystery.">
 
 
 
 
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Bluegrass Community And Technical College

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Question:
At first Angell feared it might be an airplane crashing, but a former military pilot himself, he said the colors weren't right. The orb was a bluish-white and he said it moved too slowly to be a comet.

"It was a very shallow descent and a glowing flare as it went down. It was visible for about, oh, 10-15 seconds," he explained. "Heaven only knows what it could be, but some type of a UFO. I'm not saying an alien but something."

Then, just as suddenly as it appeared, all who saw it said it disappeared into the horizon without answers to what the strange sight was.

Interestingly the National Weather Service fielded more than a dozen calls, and of course there was no report of a downed plane, so the strange object remains a mystery.


Answer:
For those who were outside Wednesday night, there was a local light show of meteoric proportions.

According to witnesses from Maysville to Frankfort, a ball of flame streaked low across the sky between 7:30-8 p.m, leaving a flickering trail of questions across the region.

"We were on our way home from my mother's house in Maysville about 8 p.m. and were going east on the AA Highway when it came into sight," said Sherry Hornback of Tollesboro. "At first I thought it was a falling star, but it looked more like a big bottle rocket that was fired off sideways. It was dropping pretty fast."

As the image appeared to lose altitude and disappeared, Hornback thought any remains may have come to rest south of Maysville.

"It was bright white, then it turned to red and a really green color before it faded out," said Hornback.

In Augusta, Wic Wachs was walking his dog along Riverside Drive when he spotted the light show.

"It was 10 times brighter than any shooting star I have ever seen," said Wachs. "It was so much brighter and more of a blue-white color than I have seen in the past."

While he watched, a small piece of the core appeared to break free and drop earthward before burning out, said Wachs.

"I watched the glare of where it went; it was very low on the horizon when I saw it."

Those driving on Kentucky 9 near Maysville also reported seeing the meteor pass over Maysville Community and Technical College in a north to south direction, though Maysville 911 dispatch said it received no calls reporting the event.

Because of the angle of the display, some witnesses believed the object had crashed to earth near where they saw it, but because of the numerous sightings over a long distance it is believed the object was a meteor.

The speeding streak of flame brought alarm to Frankfort emergency personnel when one caller reported that she observed what she thought was a plane crash, south of Interstate 64, said Daryl Hensley, dispatch communications director for Frankfort.

"She said she witnessed a plane crash in a ball of flames," said Hensley. "We scrambled emergency personnel, EMS and the deputy that was closest to the area, but they were called off when the first ones to the scene reported finding nothing."

Hensley's crews also followed through with the Bluegrass Airport tower supervisor, Capitol City Airport and the Federal Aeronautics Administration to be sure all of their aircraft were safe and accounted for.



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